Monday, June 22, 2009

Use of Insha'Allah


I am a bit unsure about how to use this expression. I know it means "if God wills", but this isn't something I'm used to thinking about... Is it only to be used for something you actually think you will do, like, "I will go to the grocery store tomorrow, insha'Allah." or "We'll meet up tomorrow, incha'Allah!".

Can you/Should you also use it for situations that you just kinda hope you will do or that you hope will happen? For example, "I hope to wake up early tomorrow to do some cleaning around the house, insha'Allah." or "Our basketball team will win tomorrow, insha'Allah."

Are both types of use correct or is it best to use it only for the first paragraph situation I described?


I also have a question about another expression. Me and my husband bought a Qur'an recitation CD and we have been listening to it in the car. When he turns it off he says something like sadaq Allah al-azeem. What does it mean? Where does the habit of saying this come from? I know the Qur'an has a specific thing about Insha'Allah. What about sadaq Allah al-atheem? Either way, I'm sure it's something that is good to say, but is it considered something you *have* to say like insha'Allah seems to be?

Thanks for the help!

21 Comentários:

Amber said...

I don't know the actual answer to the question, but I interject anyway!

I always just assumed it was something that could be added to anything that you intended to do/wanted to occur.

Like, we had a woman who worked with us who added 'Lord willin' an' the creek don't rise' to everything anybody said should/would happen in the future.

i.e.: 'see you tomorrow!' 'Lord willin' an' the creek don't rise'.

cairo, lusaka, amsterdam said...

Inshallah can be used for both examples you gave. It's just for anything that you are planning to do in the future/anything someone else is planning to do. Basically anything in the future. You're basically saying nothing happens unless God wills it.

Sadaq Allah al azeem means "God said/spoke the truth" or "God is all-knowing", I think. You don't really have to use this in every day talk, as far as I know, but I could be wrong.

Candice said...

Thanks for your comments.

Amber: lol, that's a funny expression. Never heard that! Thanks for adding it, hehe.

Sara: I think that makes sense. And yeah, I remember my husband saying it meant something like that. He's terrible at translation though so I needed to get something a bit better-worded... He only uses this after stopping the recitation. Or maybe also after reading the Qur'an, I don't know (doesn't do that so often!). I am wondering where it came from that people do this. I was googling it after I posted and fell across a discussion about it being bidah. They were saying that obviously it's not bad to say it, but if you make a ritual out of it, then you are making a ritual God did not command... My husband, for example, seems to believe it is *necessary* to say it and will not skip saying this phrase... I find this happens a lot... People making a rule out of something that is not.

zainab1 said...

As salaamu alaikum sister, I was taught to use Insha allah after every thing wished, mentioned, or about to pursue which I do . I feel Insha Allah is very important as we all know the meaning of Insha allah, ( if good wills) I feel by not applying this after speaking , we are just simply assuming things will happen , it will only happen if Allah wills , if Allah see fit. This is just my view. As salaamu alaikum (smile)

Jamilah said...

I might get in trouble with a few people for saying this, but saying Sadaq Allahu Al azeem is bida... the prophet never did, it nor did any of his companions. People will argue that its nice to say and does not hurt anyone, but Shaytan does not whisper for you to bash your neighbor over the head, he whispers things that sound good to do but are actually not.

"Today, I have completed and perfected your religion for you and chose Islam for you as your deen" (5:3)

"I warn you of the newly invented matters (in the religion), and every newly invented matter is an innovation, and every innovation is misguidance, and every misguidance is in the Hellfire." (an-Nasaa'ee)

Candice said...

Thanks for the comment, Jamila. I think you're right about it. I think that if the particular verse the person is listening to makes them exclaim "sadaq allahu al-atheem!" then that's perfectly OK, just like if it made them exclaim "allahu akbar" or anything else, but to make a ritual out of it does sound like it's bidah. Thanks for the comment.

Mrs. S said...

When I was a kid they taught us to say sadaq allahu al azeem after reciting al-Fatiha when we were praying and whenever we read Qur’an with tajweed. Does you husband ever say “auzu billahi min al-shaytan-ir-rajim” before he switches on the Qur’an? That’s another biggie that we learned before we recited.

On a cultural note, my dad and uncles like to use inshallah as another word for “No”. For example, I’d ask to go to the movies with my friends and my dad would say, “Inshallah”. It was one of those magic answers that couldn't be argued.

Candice said...

I think he might say that before turning it on, but in his head if he does. So I'm really not sure.

How funny about your dad... I'd be a little irritated with that answer!

~PakKaramu~ said...

Pak Karamu reading your blog

Anisah said...

hahah you have embarked on one of my pet peeves !!

I HATE that some muslims use Incha'allah as a way NOT to answer a question...

seems to me one would have to have an intention involved if God will be willing..correct? so... I'm all for Incha'Allah YES or Incha'Allah NO lol
there got that over with haha

Solace In Islam said...

Sis Anisah, I totally agree!

Sara said...

sadaqa Allahul adheem, i believe it means that Allah's word is true. So after you have recited Quran, aka the words of Allah, you declare that what you have read is true because it is what God has said.

SirAdib.com said...

Well, reading from the comments, I guess the questions have already been answered. :)

I remember once you made a comment concerning hadeeths so I decided to post a topic about it on my blog. Hope it removes doubts, inshaAllah.

Lisa said...

I hate when a friend says inshallah we'll get together and it never happens. But, if we all work together as Jamilah suggested to warn about bida, maybe we can make progress. Mashallah for this great discussion and love you lots habibty.

Tutti said...

I say inshaAllah because i heard that Yajuj and Majuj will try for a long time to escape and the only time they will be successful is when they will say "inshaAllah." It also reminds you that nothing happens in this world without Allah's swt permission. my 2cents. And WHY did you not tell us you had a blog?

Candice said...

Thanks for the comment, Tutti! Is this from AP Muslim? If so, I'm just a newbie on the forum and on blogs! The only other blog mentionned was a mega-popular one!

Tuttie said...

yup. I am umm ibraheem.

XsiLon said...

Saying sadaqAllahul adzeem is not bidah. Please read in al-Quran verse 3:95 . When discussing about the tafsir(meaning) of the ayah, ulama have said that saying 'Sadaqallah' is an ibadah. And then they concluded that no time is more appropriate to say it than after reading a Quranic verse.

Please becareful when saying something as bidah. Because to make it 'haram'(forbidden) what Allah has made it 'halal'(allowed) is a big sin. Indeed that's the real bidah.

Candice said...

XsiLon. I don't think anyone said that it was bida to pronounce this phrase. It is a good phrase to pronounce. But I actually do think it's bida to consider it an obligation from God to pronounce it after hearing Qur'an. My husband just says it and thinks it's wrong not to. I think he is attributing this "rule" to God, and this is bida and a sin. So people have to be careful both ways (not to make haram what is halal and not to attribute rules to Allah that are not from Him). To just say it because you believe it is perfectly fine and very good.

SirAdib.com said...

Actually, we have to be very careful in the way we worship.

Everything in this world is halal unless there is daleel to prove its haram, while every form of worship is haraam unless there is daleel to prove its halal.

So to say what Allah has made halal in the ibadah, you must bring forth the daleel first. If not, then its best not to do the ibadah.

Allah knows best.

Candice said...

I agree with this. Thank you for your comment!

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