Wednesday, April 1, 2009

My Qur'an translation is by Abdullah Yusuf Ali

If anyone has any info about the translator I'd really be intrested in hearing it!

I love to read the back covers of books. I don't read that many books, honestly, not because I don't want to, because I love to read, but mostly because of time. A bit because of laziness because I could very well be reading right now and I'm just posting... But anyway, I love to read covers. I feel I learn just from reading a back cover. If it's of a novel, it puts my imagination to work imagining what the complete story could be like. In other types, it can spike interest in a subject. And I just love a glimpse into a book. I wish reading and writing the back cover of books could be my profession. Haha. So I will leave you with the back cover of this Quran translation.

The Quran is a book of divine warning -- a combination of lessons and admonitions. It stresses the importance of man's discovery of truth at the level of realization.

Every book has its objective and the objective of the Quran is to make man aware of the Creation plan of God. That is, to tell man why God created this world; what the purpose is of settling man on earth; what is required from man in his pre-death life span, and what he is going to confront after death.

Man is born as an eternal creature. When God created man as such, He divided his life span into two periods, the pre-death period, which is a time of trial, and the post-death period, which is the time for receiving the rewards or punishments merited by one's actions during one's lifetime.

The purpose of the Quran is to make man aware of this reality. This is theme of this divine Book, wihch serves to guide man through his entire journey through life into the after-life.

13 Comentários:

Nawaz said...

I have read a few translations of the Quran as I am unable to understand arabic right now. Abdullah Yusuf Ali's is one of the more controversal ones. I don't want to comment on it too much as I am not a scholar or anything and rather new to being active in my research of my religion. However if I could give you one piece of advice it would be this:

Don't take anything you read in any translation of the Quran literally.

I know this sounds crazy, and trust me after you read it for many months it will sound really crazy. You'll swear the world has now become crystal clear to you. I used to but have now learnt why I should not. Every brother I know makes this mistake but over time Allah opens our eyes. The Quran lays out so much in what suddenly appears to be black an white but ultimately its only the black and white the translator sees that reaches you in a translation. Instead use the translation as a guide to the topics covered in the Quran, take heed of the expressive way it tries to teach us and the stories it tells as the ones you should take to be the most important to ponder.

This is the crucial bit... use the knowledge that a topic is covered in the the Quran to then further research it and try to look up other translations, articles, lectures etc of the same ayats/passages/topics. That way you can get a feel for the various translations those specific arabic words could mean and some sort of background to their revelation.

Habibti said...

as salamau alaykum i just saw you lived in quebec. thats wonderful i live there too. i hope you find your way in islam Incha Allah

Anonymous said...

I like Yusuf Ali---and anyway, all translations are controversial depending on your point of view

Jamilah said...

I laughed when I heard your husband didn't like anything not stamped with Al Azhar... Egyptian to the core! :)

Al Azhar can be great but it also has produced some strange rulings lately....

أم ترافيس said...

Al Azhar is also very well known for Sufism...

Anyway, about the translation I have no idea but you can go here to compare:

http://www.quranexplorer.com/quran

Also read the Ibn Kathir tafseer, it will really help (of course that is a translation as well...)

For Quran I prefer Dr. Mohsin myself.

Candice said...

Nawaz, good advice. I am very careful about how I read things and I'm aware of how subjective a translation is.

Habibti, where in Quebec do you live? I'm in the Eastern Townships.

Jamilah and Umm Travis, I don't know much about Al-Azhar, but I don't trust them more than any other source. I am very surprised that they "are very well known for Sufism". My husband probably doesn't know about that.

Habibti said...

what is the eastern townships lol i live in quebec city

Candice said...

I'm in the Montérégie region. *Almost* in the Estrie region, which is really most of the Eastern Townships... I'm right between Sherbrooke and Montreal.

Habibti said...

oh ok excuse me im not really familiar with other towns apart from trois rivieres, montreal, quebec city, sherbrooke lol. isnt where you live a little town ?

Candice said...

It's not big! Totally normal that you would not know it, and totally normal that you don't know about the Eastern Townships too. Not a big and populated area, that's for sure!

khany said...

the abdullah yusuf ali (along with the older marmaduke pickthal) translation of the qur'an is the most widely-known and used in the english language.

no translation can do justice to the original text of the qur'an. still, abdullah yusuf ali's translation is widely accepted within the mainstream.

Candice said...

Thanks, I read some and I quite liked the translation. The writing style and all that. Much better than my other one. It contained weird errors...

Anonymous said...

Al Azhar is the centre for learning Sunni Islam, of course it will teach Sufism because it caters for diversity, unlike other schools who do not tolerate differences (salafis to be specific). I also use Yusuf Ali translation.

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